reviews\ Sep 22, 2015 at 3:33 pm

Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer Review

Designed on a Dime: Animal Crossing Edition

Animal Crossing has always been this strange, zen-like series of games that provided you with endless free-form gameplay. It's a title that didn't give you tasks or checklists, but instead tasked you with making your own each day. Would you focus on collecting bugs? Dig up fossils? Perhaps plant a bunch of apple trees? Or maybe make some spare change by selling off your shell collection that washed up on the beach? The point is, you lived your day-to-day life how you wanted, never governed by the game.

Now, I loved New Leaf and its new gameplay innovations. After all, being mayor certainly has its perks. However, it was a game that after a couple of months, I just couldn't force myself to keep checking up on. The fact that I'm always limited by what time of day I'm playing, as well as what season I'm playing in was a slight downside. After all, I am the type that thrives on checklists. It's primarily one of the reasons why I'm OK with Ubisoft titles and their extremely filled up open-world maps brimming with icons. I like being led while still retaining the freedom of how I get there.

For that very reason, I actually ended up enjoying Happy Home Designer a bit more. In this title, you're no longer the wide-eyed new resident of your very own village. This time, you're living on the business side of things. That's right, you're one of Tom Nook's underlings. Sure, you might not as money grubbing as he is, but you're certainly working for his company. The change in gameplay presented here is something I was always craving in an Animal Crossing game. I now have a checklist of sorts, and I'm also not limited nor constrained by a real-life clock system.

The Positives / The Negatives

The Verdict

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Mike Splechta GameZone's review copy hoarding D-bag extraordinaire! Follow me @MichaelSplechta
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